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SCHOOL of THEOLOGY => Catholicism => Topic started by: me again on May 07, 2010, 06:53:12 PM

Title: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on May 07, 2010, 06:53:12 PM
So has anyone here ever studied Catholicism and the Catholic Catechism (http://www.vatican.va/archive/catechism/ccc_toc.htm)? :eek:

We hear so much about it -- and there are many websites about it -- but has anyone ever gone straight to the source to study it e.g. the Catholic Catechism? It would be interesting to see what it says.

I'm too busy to read the Catholic Catechism, so I bought a book called Catholicism for Dummies (http://www.dummies.com/store/product/Catholicism-For-Dummies.productCd-0764553917.html) and it's straightforward. You don't need a college degree in theology to understand the basic tenants that are explained. However, I'm only on about page 3 so far. :snicker:

Thoughts?  :o
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Jimmy Clifton on May 22, 2010, 08:51:00 PM
Quote from: me again;45246
So has anyone here ever studied Catholicism and the Catholic Catechism (http://www.vatican.va/archive/catechism/ccc_toc.htm)? :eek:

We hear so much about it -- and there are many websites about it -- but has anyone ever gone straight to the source to study it e.g. the Catholic Catechism? It would be interesting to see what it says.

I'm too busy to read the Catholic Catechism, so I bought a book called Catholicism for Dummies (http://www.dummies.com/store/product/Catholicism-For-Dummies.productCd-0764553917.html) and it's straightforward. You don't need a college degree in theology to understand the basic tenants that are explained. However, I'm only on about page 3 so far. :snicker:

:confused: Thoughts? :boink:


I grew up in New Orleans and have studied Catholicism.  It's an interesting denomination, especially the Old Catholic and Liberal Catholic groups.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: eegles2003 on June 09, 2010, 06:23:50 AM
denomination?  i never thought of the catholic chuch as a denomination.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Jimmy Clifton on June 10, 2010, 10:34:46 PM
Quote from: eegles2003;45286
denomination?  i never thought of the catholic chuch as a denomination.


Guess I never gave it much thought.  The Roman Catholic Church is listed as a denomination in all of Mead's Handbook of Denominations as well as The Encyclopedia of American Religions.  Interesting thought, however.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on June 11, 2010, 09:03:57 AM
Quote from: Jimmy Clifton;45259
I grew up in New Orleans and have studied Catholicism.  It's an interesting denomination, especially the Old Catholic and Liberal Catholic groups.
It says "The Baha''i Faith" in your sig. What the heck is that???
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Jimmy Clifton on June 11, 2010, 08:39:57 PM
Quote from: me again;45292
It says "The Baha''i Faith" in your sig. What the heck is that???


It's a link, click on it.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on June 11, 2010, 10:25:58 PM
Quote from: Jimmy Clifton;45296
It's a link, click on it.
Ahhhhhhh I clicked on it!!!! :frusty:
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Quasar on July 16, 2010, 04:40:36 PM
Hi guys,

First of all, check out: 

http://www.bereancall.org/newsletters/heresy.htm (http://www.bereancall.org/newsletters/heresy.htm)

Make no mistake, unless you understand the intended Scriptural theological interpretion of the Scriptures, and fall into the dogma of Catholicism, it will eat you alive!  Beginning with Amillennialism and Replacement theology as a case and point.  The latter being the trigger for the horrible Crusades.  Check out what Chuck Missler has to say about it:

http://deeperwalk.lefora.com/2010/07/16/origin-of-amillennialism-and-the-replacement-theol/ (http://deeperwalk.lefora.com/2010/07/16/origin-of-amillennialism-and-the-replacement-theol/)

Though I know this will hit a sore spot with some, but trinitarianism is another heresy in the attempt to describe God/Father/Son/HolySpirit.  It is not only in gross error, but verges on being literally silly, if the issue was not as serious as it is.

The key key logical failure is the following RCC stand on passages such as Mt.28:19 and 1 Jn.5:7.  In which the first is a gross alteration by a trinitarian zealot scribe, while 1 Jn.5:7 doesn't appear in any of the most reliable Greek mss.  But shows up much later in some of the Latin mss around the 12th century.  It is a flat out additive, in as much gross error as Mt.28:19 is.

The reason why they are so far out in lala land is the following:

The Doctrine of the Trinity consists of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, right?  What's wrong with that?

The Scriptures record God to be Spirit, in Jn.1:18; 4:24; Rom.1:20; 2 Cor.3:17-18; Col.1:15 and 1 Jn.4:12.  That He is Holy, in Lev.11:44-45 as well as in 1 Pet.1:15-16.  Therefore He is the Holy Spirit.  There is only one God, according to Isa.43:10 and 44:6!  This One God, who is the Holy Spirit, became the Father of Jesus Christ, as He had prophecied He was going to be many times in the OT, such as Ps.2:7, in Mt.1:20 and in Lk.1:35.

Now the fact of the matter is this:  God, who is the Holy Spirit, according to the Scriptures, is also the Father.  Which is the very same title all men receive when they produce children of their own.  Therefore, The Father and the Holy Spirit are one and he same!  One person - not two!

If anyone is looking for me, tell them I just left!  :)


Quasar
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Danny on January 25, 2011, 11:07:13 AM
Is Chuck Missler denying the trinity?  Or, did I read that incorrectly?
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Baptist-boy on February 05, 2011, 07:10:27 PM

Most certainly the Catholic (Roman) Church is the only repository of salvation and the rest of the Christian world are poor hand me down dogs who have missed the point.  The only problem is history is not complete enough prove their assertion.  Hans Kung noted there are large gaps in the catholic succession and without those missing links proof cannot be offered.  The information regarding the early church apart from the Bible is quite sketchy and for over a hundred years it was primarily an oral history.  There are shinning stars but darkness regarding any idea of apostolic succession.

The Romans would have one believe after Augustine and the rise of his own theology no other church existed.  Why, Because they killed ones who would not become a part of imperial church.   My personal conviction is there has always been a decenting church who did not join with the Romans.  There a fleeting glances of them in history but proving the point has the same problems as proving a continuous succession of bishops.  From that perspective both sand on equal ground. 

I think the importance for modern non-catholic is to go back to the first century church fathers and read and then take the ideas and use them.  While we cannot know the exact nature of the primitive church there are some road maps left for us.  This is a real reformation of faith and though.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Stan on February 05, 2011, 07:43:14 PM
Or were they the first off-shoot from Christianity?
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on February 06, 2011, 07:53:02 AM
Or were they the first off-shoot from Christianity?

Hummmmmmm never thought of it that way.  :o
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on February 06, 2011, 07:57:31 AM
Hans Kung noted there are large gaps in the catholic succession and without those missing links proof cannot be offered.

The book Catholicism for Dummies teaches that there are two official sources of sacred knowledge:
1. Sacred scriptures
2. Sacred tradition (within the Catholic Church).

For example, nowhere in the bible does it say that Jesus was married or unmarried or that he had children or that he didn't have children. Anyone who says that Jesus was married or wasn't married is adding to something that isn't in the bible. So where does Christianity get the idea that Jesus was not married and did not have children? Catholicism teaches that it's part of sacred tradition.

Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Baptist-boy on February 06, 2011, 03:31:01 PM
You are right regarding the role of tradition in the Catholic church/s/. Moving toward a discussion of the marital status of the Lord is a new topic and not comparable with the former concept.  Let me interject another catholic dogma, that of the Conscience of the Church.  This teaches even if a bishop speaks ex-cathedra (teaching as infallible interpreter of the word of God) or if a church council makes a new teaching or canon the conscience of the church can reject the teaching.  Now the Romans have attempted to modify this by the pope being infallible (1872 circa).

The reason I mention this is the conscience of the church is also a way maintaining good doctrine in the church.  Many teachers including the Masons have attempted to invent doctrines saying Mary M and Jesus were cohabiting lovers and Jesus had children which decedents who became the crown heads of Europe and finally the divine right of kings to rule.  There are other absurdities not worth mentioning in this small space.  The point is the conscience of the church has always rejected these teachings.  You see even in modern day and in protestantism the conscience of the church continues to work.  It is an expression of the spirit of regeneration working in the believer and it is this spirit which ultimately leads the church and stabilizes its doctrine.

In modern Baptist Churches we teach because the spirit resides in each member the church comes together and after prayer votes and the decision represents not just a consensus  but the will of God in the matter.  This is again the conscience of the church.  It cannot be applied to politics because the politics are in the arena of the secular and to work the conscience of the assumes regeneration.  It did so in  the early church and later baptism even was of infants the symbol of regeneration.  This is the point were the church began to be the imperial church.

My mention of Hans Kung was to illustrate modern roman theologians disagree with the infallibility of the pope and some like Kung take issue with mystic power coming though the apostolic succession.  Denying this mystic power then makes the papal office a farce of poor doctrine.  On the other hand the conscience of the church may take a long time work and maybe it is again working in the romans churches.  In Isaiah's time the Word of the Lord was lost in the house of the Lord.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on February 19, 2011, 08:51:28 AM
Let me interject another catholic dogma, that of the Conscience of the Church.  This teaches even if a bishop speaks ex-cathedra (teaching as infallible interpreter of the word of God) or if a church council makes a new teaching or canon the conscience of the church can reject the teaching.  Now the Romans have attempted to modify this by the pope being infallible (1872 circa).

Catholicism teaches that the pope is fallible, along with his teachings, unless he is speaking from the chair of Peter in conjunction with the magisterium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magisterium). This is similar to the way the Baptists do it at a local level, except this is at a Catholic or global level.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Baptist-boy on February 22, 2011, 12:19:33 PM
"Catholicism teaches that the pope is fallible, along with his teachings, unless he is speaking from the chair of Peter in conjunction with the magisterium. This is similar to the way the Baptists do it at a local level, except this is at a Catholic or global level"

Baptists teach the Priesthood of the Believer and believe when a church is gathered together in a prayerful manner that the voting of the church will reflect the will of Holy Spirit in selecting a pastor or other matters of business.  The Word of God is always the basis and measure of correctness because the Spirit will never be contrary to the scriptures.

The Orthodox Church which was and is the precursor to the Church of the Roman's teach the doctrine of the Conscience of the Church" and do not have a magisterium in the sense of the Roman concept.   They have the Councils as a basis of Canon Law (yes, the will shoot you with it if your get out of line).  After the late 1970's the Romans have taught the Pope is Infallible (Vat 1).  That is also when the teaching of Mary as being conceived without sin was made part of the formal teaching of the church.  In Vatican 2 the teaching of the Pope being infallible was clarified to mean that when the pope speaks something automatically becomes part of the body of theology of the church.  The pope by virtue of his infallibility can change doctrine and over rule church councils.  This had not been the case for 1700 hundred years.  If the current pope would just become born again much of these non-sense  teachings would die a quick and humane death.

In Baptist understanding the HOly Spirit enters the person when he is born again and not when one is baptized as a toddler and given the spirit at the hands of the priest when oil is applied in chrismation.  This is the practice of the Orthodox Church and is the Historic teaching of the Roman Church and continues to be taught in parts of Mexico and Puerto Rico.  The functional application is that of Regenerate Church Membership as the basis for the operation of the Priesthood of the Believer.

I hope this clarifies the difference between Orthodox Catholic, Roman Catholic and Baptist teachings.

By The Way, was w.A. Criswell a Southern Baptist Pope?
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Overaged on March 12, 2012, 02:22:50 AM
So has anyone here ever studied Catholicism and the Catholic Catechism (http://www.vatican.va/archive/catechism/ccc_toc.htm)? :eek:

We hear so much about it -- and there are many websites about it -- but has anyone ever gone straight to the source to study it e.g. the Catholic Catechism? It would be interesting to see what it says.


I studied regularly with Roman Catholic apologists and lay members, for five years. It was a very interesting experience, to say the least.

One thing I would say at this point though is that there are a lot of really wild misconceptions and misunderstandings on what they officially teach and why.

It's not just a matter of studying the Catechism; one must get out there and be in person with Roman Catholics who are well trained in their beliefs, to really understand 2 things:

1) What they believe and how well you actually understand it
2) What you believe and how well you actually understand it.

One thing that I would urge caution with is how Roman Catholic theology will use similar words as Protestants, but with much different meanings than what Protestants would mean when they use same.

A good example would be the word Bible. They say they are a Bible-based Church. But what do they actually mean when they say "Bible," as opposed to what we mean when we say it?

I was quite shocked by the answer when I first discovered it.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on March 12, 2012, 09:09:15 AM
One thing that I would urge caution with is how Roman Catholic theology will use similar words as Protestants, but with much different meanings than what Protestants would mean when they use same.

A good example would be the word Bible. They say they are a Bible-based Church. But what do they actually mean when they say "Bible," as opposed to what we mean when we say it?

I was quite shocked by the answer when I first discovered it.

Are you going to leave us on that cliff hanger?  :o LOL

If my memory serves me correctly, they have three things that they consider to be equivalent in authority:
1. Holy scriptures
2. Holy traditions (passed down from the apostles either by word of mouth or by letter)
3. Magisterium

Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Overaged on March 30, 2012, 01:53:40 AM
Are you going to leave us on that cliff hanger?  :o LOL

If my memory serves me correctly, they have three things that they consider to be equivalent in authority:
1. Holy scriptures
2. Holy traditions (passed down from the apostles either by word of mouth or by letter)
3. Magisterium

LOL; sorry about the cliff hanger. But you said it very well   :)
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Quasar on May 21, 2012, 08:48:45 AM
From the Catholic Eschatological Exegesis in the link below, are found the errors of 1. Amillennialism, that there will be no kingdom on earth of Jesus, and a restored kingdom of Israel;

2. Supersessionism/Replacement theology, of replacing Israel with the Church and referring to the Church as the True Israel; 3. the denial of the pre-tribulation rapture of the Church and the Millennial reign of Jesus Here on the earth; 4 attributing the teachings of Jesus, Paul, John and Luke on the pre-tribulation rapture of the Church and of the restored kingdom of Israel, when Jesus will reign of the throne of David here on earth, to John Darby; 5.That Jesus kingdom will be in heaven; the word prophecy is never mentioned once, though there is 27% of the Bible that is prophecy.

http://www.ignatiusinsight.com/features2006/colson_eschatology_jun06.asp


Quasar
 
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Catalyst on August 03, 2012, 09:29:31 PM
So has anyone here ever studied Catholicism and the Catholic Catechism (http://www.vatican.va/archive/catechism/ccc_toc.htm)? :eek:

We hear so much about it -- and there are many websites about it -- but has anyone ever gone straight to the source to study it e.g. the Catholic Catechism? It would be interesting to see what it says.

I'm too busy to read the Catholic Catechism, so I bought a book called Catholicism for Dummies (http://www.dummies.com/store/product/Catholicism-For-Dummies.productCd-0764553917.html) and it's straightforward. You don't need a college degree in theology to understand the basic tenants that are explained. However, I'm only on about page 3 so far. :snicker:

Thoughts?  :o

Nope.

But, what I have done is debate with educated and reasonable Catholics their positions.  Understood the arguments, then tried to support them biblically, rather than find verses to argue against them.  The latter leads to Eisegesis and proof texting.  I also went to early Church Fathers and looked for their observations.

I will defend Apostolic Authority.  I will defend their position that the Church is God's "neck" and Christ is the head of the church.  I will defend that if the Pope sit as the head of the bishops, on a debate theologically and decided that his decision would be as absolute as if Christ made it on earth, OR James did in Jerusalem.  What I can't do, is claim that Rome holds the Church that is actually God's church.  But, their idea is well documented biblically. 

I will defend that the idea we have today of sola scriptura is contradicted by the scriptura itself.  But, again, I can't say that Rome has the crown to determine what to say, but ABSOULTELY our interpretations should be in line with Church History, the Patristic teachings, etc...  To not be would mean we have made a change.  And personally I don't think we are that bright.

I find scripture very clear that there is to be one Church not many.  And that since the reformation the fruit of that maneuver has caused divisions and fractions, which Paul says is of the flesh, not the Spirit in Gal 5:19-21. 

So, I hope that if I'm going to be shunned, it would be after we discussed why I believe what I believe.  And I'd remind anyone who might want to shun me, that I don't support Rome as the owner of some of their claims, I merely acknowledge they are Biblical.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Quasar on August 07, 2012, 09:40:54 AM
Check out the following critique of Catholocism:


Due to the length of these two reports I will provide the links for those who care to check it out.

http://deeperwalk.lefora.com/2011/06/16/criticism-of-catholic-beliefs/

See also:  LIST OF HERESIES And HUMAN TRADITIONS ADOPTED by the ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE COURSE OF 1600 YEARS

http://deeperwalk.lefora.com/2011/08/26/list-of-adopted-roman-catholic-heresies-and-human-/


Quasar

Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Catalyst on August 07, 2012, 07:24:06 PM
The book Catholicism for Dummies teaches that there are two official sources of sacred knowledge:
1. Sacred scriptures
2. Sacred tradition (within the Catholic Church).

For example, nowhere in the bible does it say that Jesus was married or unmarried or that he had children or that he didn't have children. Anyone who says that Jesus was married or wasn't married is adding to something that isn't in the bible. So where does Christianity get the idea that Jesus was not married and did not have children? Catholicism teaches that it's part of sacred tradition.

Errrr.  Paul commanded that timothy remember the things he said, and teach them and pass them on.  DING  Right there, Paul supported and taught tradition.

People really need to rethink some of their presuppositions periodically and check what they've been taught.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Quasar on August 16, 2012, 12:03:54 PM
Check this out:  http://theologyreview.com/index.php/topic,7200.msg48098.html#new


Quasar
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: stMichael on April 01, 2013, 01:49:54 AM
I'm too busy to read the Catholic Catechism, so I bought a book called Catholicism for Dummies (http://www.dummies.com/store/product/Catholicism-For-Dummies.productCd-0764553917.html) and it's straightforward. You don't need a college degree in theology to understand the basic tenants that are explained. However, I'm only on about page 3 so far. :snicker:

Thoughts?  :o

Hello Me Again,   Nice of you to try to go to the source instead...  I was hoping you would have converted to the Catholic Faith by now... LOL

How have you been?
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: stMichael on April 01, 2013, 02:12:08 AM
So has anyone here ever studied Catholicism and the Catholic Catechism (http://www.vatican.va/archive/catechism/ccc_toc.htm)? :eek:

I have read a lot of it...  Studied it but can't say all of it...   I use it as a reference more than a front to back book to read...   It depends on the subject matter that is my focus...   The Gospels are the main books for a Catholic... 

If a Catholic went to Mass ever day of the year the would have the Bible read to them in almost in it's entirety...   If they only go to Sunday Mass it would take three years to have the Bible read to you....
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 02, 2013, 08:45:42 AM
Hello Me Again,   Nice of you to try to go to the source instead...  I was hoping you would have converted to the Catholic Faith by now... LOL

I did, although I didn't advertise it or discuss it here. I'm also in a Roman Catholic graduate program for pastoral ministries for laypeople, but I've been silent on the issue until now -- because you asked. LOL

The book (Catholicism for Dummies (http://books.google.com/books/about/Catholicism_For_Dummies.html?id=-VM-EXgGw_cC)) is actually the best, most comprehensive and easy-to-read book I've ever read on the issue because it's broken down into logical and manageable sections, including a historical perspective (such as the schism of 1054 C.E.), praying to the saints (Heb. 12:1a (http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=heb%2012:1&version=NRSVCE)), and other technical issues that are explained in easy-to-understand terms. It's a wonderful book for an outsider because it opens the door of understanding in a simple way. Coincidentally, I just got the book out a couple of days ago to look something up and was considering  re-reading it again, since it's such an easy read.  It's sitting beside me right now.  :o

Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: stMichael on April 02, 2013, 09:37:38 AM
I did, although I didn't advertise it or discuss it here. I'm also in a Roman Catholic graduate program for pastoral ministries for laypeople, but I've been silent on the issue until now -- because you asked. LOL

That is awesome news...  welcome home...  I pray people will always seek the truth where ever it leads them... 
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 02, 2013, 11:31:34 AM
That is awesome news...  welcome home...  I pray people will always seek the truth where ever it leads them...

Are you the same St. Michael that posted here about 3 or 5 years ago?
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: stMichael on April 02, 2013, 03:50:17 PM
Are you the same St. Michael that posted here about 3 or 5 years ago?

Yes...  Been on a. Purple ones...   Christian Chat also
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 02, 2013, 06:15:17 PM
Yes...  Been on a. Purple ones...   Christian Chat also

Ah yes.

I think it was you (?) who once wrote that people use the term "Roman" Catholic in a degrading way or as a way of being condescending, instead of just using the term Catholic, but I never saw it that way. It says "Roman" Catholic on my baptismal certificate (from when I was a baby) and I never saw their (or my) use of the term as being derogatory.

If it wasn't you, then never mind! LOL  :o
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: stMichael on April 02, 2013, 10:50:51 PM
Ah yes. 

I think it was you (?) who once wrote that people use the term "Roman" Catholic in a degrading way or as a way of being condescending, instead of just using the term Catholic, but I never saw it that way. It says "Roman" Catholic on my baptismal certificate (from when I was a baby) and I never saw their (or my) use of the term as being derogatory. 

If it wasn't you, then never mind! LOL  :o

You are correct it was me...   A good little read is here

http://www.ewtn.com/faith/teachings/churb3.htm

The use of the term "Roman Catholic" has been used as it should as well as a degrading way...  

The Catholic Church is the official name...  Within the the Church we have different Rites...  The Roman rite is what You are part of, as well as myself...   

Each rite has there own expression of the one faith all within the One Catholic Church...

The use of the Term "Roman Catholic Church" emerged from the English speaking countries and it was used mostly as a degrading sense..   It has been used so much the last 500 years that people do not know any better in most cases...   

The Catholic Church uses distinction to know what expressions and/or disciplines one has accepted...   Some would be surprised to find out Priest in some other rites can get married...   Married priest is a displine within a rite and not an article of faith...  When we are baptized it is always within a rite, hence why your certificate would use the word "Roman".

When the Protestant Churches come back home as some have a new Rite maybe developed to allow them to express the one faith in a way that had developed in the years of there separation from full communion with the One Catholic Church....
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 05, 2013, 09:42:01 AM
That's a good article. It explains that Roman Catholicism is simply a rite, just like other rites. Very good info.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on April 23, 2013, 06:12:40 PM
Here is just some of the false teachings that the Catholic church admits to with the biggest being salvation by works.
http://www.catholicdoors.com/courses/salvatio.htm
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 24, 2013, 08:26:58 AM
Here is just some of the false teachings that the Catholic church admits to with the biggest being salvation by works.
http://www.catholicdoors.com/courses/salvatio.htm

Can you please do two things:
1. Ask one question at a time. Posting 20 questions is too voluminous and time consuming for a working person to address.
2. Provide professional references to support your understanding of what Catholicism teaches. Posting a link to a Protestant website as proof of what all Protestants believe is like posting a link to an alleged Catholic website as proof of what Catholic dogma is. Sources that you can reliably use include the bible, the Catechism (http://www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/what-we-believe/catechism/catechism-of-the-catholic-church/epub/index.cfm) or the Vatican website.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on April 24, 2013, 05:38:01 PM
Can you please do two things:
1. Ask one question at a time. Posting 20 questions is too voluminous and time consuming for a working person to address.
2. Provide professional references to support your understanding of what Catholicism teaches. Posting a link to a Protestant website as proof of what all Protestants believe is like posting a link to an alleged Catholic website as proof of what Catholic dogma is. Sources that you can reliably use include the bible, the Catechism (http://www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/what-we-believe/catechism/catechism-of-the-catholic-church/epub/index.cfm) or the Vatican website.

What are you talking about. That link is to a Catholic web site. They are admitting the things they posted are what the Catholic church believes.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 24, 2013, 08:29:56 PM
What are you talking about. That link is to a Catholic web site. They are admitting the things they posted are what the Catholic church believes.

One question at a time, please.  :)
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on April 25, 2013, 05:45:42 AM
One question at a time, please.  :)
Pick one
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 25, 2013, 07:48:51 AM
Pick one

They are your questions, so please grace the board with the question that you would like to be addressed.  :)
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on April 26, 2013, 04:29:58 PM
They are your questions, so please grace the board with the question that you would like to be addressed.  :)

All of them.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 27, 2013, 05:54:00 AM
All of them.

Since they are your questions, would you please state which one you would like to be addressed first?  :)
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on April 27, 2013, 09:03:17 AM
Since they are your questions, would you please state which one you would like to be addressed first?  :)
Make it easy on yourself. Pick any one you like.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 27, 2013, 08:03:31 PM
Make it easy on yourself. Pick any one you like.

I don't like any of them. LOL  :)

Subsequently, please feel free to pick the first one that you want. LOL  ;D
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on April 27, 2013, 11:29:56 PM
I don't like any of them. LOL  :)

Subsequently, please feel free to pick the first one that you want. LOL  ;D
I don't blame you. It is difficult to find out that you are part of a false religion. I told you before and I tell you again, RUN from it.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 28, 2013, 09:56:06 AM
It is difficult to find out that you are part of a false religion.

LOL  :)
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on April 28, 2013, 05:49:54 PM
LOL  :)
If you were honest you would set down and examine what they claim and do and what the bible says.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 28, 2013, 07:18:34 PM
If you were honest you would set down and examine what they claim and do and what the bible says.

Is your inference that I'm dishonest?  :o
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on April 29, 2013, 12:06:03 AM
Is your inference that I'm dishonest?  :o

If you do not examine the truth, yes.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 29, 2013, 08:36:44 AM
Is your inference that I'm dishonest?  :o

If you do not examine the truth, yes.

And the same could be said for anyone who intentionally doesn't examine the truth, to include you, correct?  :o
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on April 29, 2013, 06:34:38 PM


And the same could be said for anyone who intentionally doesn't examine the truth, to include you, correct?  :o

What truth are you speaking of?
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on April 30, 2013, 09:06:23 PM
What truth are you speaking of?

Hummmmm that's not the first time that question has been asked.  :)

"Pilate saith unto him, What is truth?." (John 18:38)

"Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you." Matthew 7:6

Jesus answered, "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." (John 14:16)

"Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free." (John 8:32)  :D
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on May 01, 2013, 12:29:11 AM
Hummmmm that's not the first time that question has been asked.  :)

"Pilate saith unto him, What is truth?." (John 18:38)

"Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you." Matthew 7:6

Jesus answered, "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." (John 14:16)

"Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free." (John 8:32)  :D

I believe all that so what truth are you speaking of?
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on May 01, 2013, 12:29:10 PM
Hummmmm that's not the first time that question has been asked.  :)

"Pilate saith unto him, What is truth?." (John 18:38)

"Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you." Matthew 7:6

Jesus answered, "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." (John 14:16)

"Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free." (John 8:32)  :D

I believe all that so what truth are you speaking of?

It's nice to know that you agree with me.  :o
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on May 01, 2013, 01:22:08 PM
I believe all that so what truth are you speaking of?


It's nice to know that you agree with me.  :o

No, I agree with scripture which you do not fully accept.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on May 01, 2013, 02:24:29 PM
No, I agree with scripture which you do not fully accept.

But if anyone agrees with your opinion, then they are biblically correct?  :)
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on May 01, 2013, 05:25:18 PM
But if anyone agrees with your opinion, then they are biblically correct?  :)

That is your problem, Since you do not believe that the bible is correct and means what it says you think everyone has an opinion about what is true. I believe what the bible says, but you do not. So I don't need an opinion just faith which you lack.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on May 01, 2013, 07:13:40 PM
That is your problem, Since you do not believe that the bible is correct and means what it says you think everyone has an opinion about what is true. I believe what the bible says, but you do not. So I don't need an opinion just faith which you lack.

This is too funny. The entertainment value is amazing. Is someone paying you to write that stuff or do you really believe that stuff? LOL  ;D
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on May 01, 2013, 07:15:20 PM
This is too funny. The entertainment value is amazing. Is someone paying you to write that stuff or do you really believe that stuff? LOL  ;D

What is funny today will be terror tomorrow for those like yourself who rejects the word of God for their own religion.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on May 01, 2013, 07:27:31 PM
What is funny today will be terror tomorrow for those like yourself who rejects the word of God for their own religion.

That is dubiously very interesting, Mr. "Saved."  ???
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: saved on May 01, 2013, 07:37:29 PM
That is dubiously very interesting, Mr. "Saved."  ???
Due 4:23,24 Take heed unto yourselves, lest ye forget the covenant of the LORD your God, which he made with you, and make you a graven image, [or] the likeness of any [thing], which the LORD thy God hath forbidden thee.
For the LORD thy God [is] a consuming fire, [even] a jealous God.

Mat 24:4And Jesus answered and said unto them, Take heed that no man (Pope) deceive you.

So back to the OP question. Yes I have explored Catholicism. I used to attend catholic church and once I came to the Lord I knew it was a false religion. I could either follow the Catholic teachings or the Lord's (the bible). I chose the Lord.
Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: Don777 on July 03, 2013, 05:27:35 PM
The book Catholicism for Dummies teaches that there are two official sources of sacred knowledge:
1. Sacred scriptures
2. Sacred tradition (within the Catholic Church).

For example, nowhere in the bible does it say that Jesus was married or unmarried or that he had children or that he didn't have children. Anyone who says that Jesus was married or wasn't married is adding to something that isn't in the bible. So where does Christianity get the idea that Jesus was not married and did not have children? Catholicism teaches that it's part of sacred tradition.

From a Scriptural point of view, if something isn't mentioned in the Bible, it is impossible to establish it as a Biblical truth. On the other hand, it is correct to say that the Bible gives no reason for us to consider that Jesus was married... or does it?


Title: Re: Have you ever explored Catholicism?
Post by: me again on July 04, 2013, 02:40:57 PM
From a Scriptural point of view, if something isn't mentioned in the Bible, it is impossible to establish it as a Biblical truth. On the other hand, it is correct to say that the Bible gives no reason for us to consider that Jesus was married... or does it?

Good question. Nowhere is it mentioned in the bible that:
1. Jesus was unmarried or
2. Jesus was married.

We cannot add to the bible by stating that Jesus was or was not married, but we accept Christian tradition that Jesus was unmarried. Tradition comes from the first apostles and it was handed down through the generations to us.

There are some people who say that since the bible does not say that Jesus was married, we cannot infer that he was married. But conversely, since the bible does not say that Jesus was unmarried, we cannot infer that he was unmarried. Subsequently, we are relying on Church tradition.

It's a two sided coin, as I see it!  ???